PKD National Convention: Better Together

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Convention Highlights

Featured Speaker: Dr. Gregory Germino

Deputy Director, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Dr. Germino became the Deputy Director of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 2009. Prior to joining NIDDK, Dr. Germino was a full professor at the Johns Hopkins University where he directed the Johns Hopkins Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) Center and served as a consultant attending on the renal service and as a teaching attending on the general medical service. He participated in multiple university committees and was a member of several editorial boards and grant review panels for numerous institutional, NIH, foundation, and international funding organizations. In addition, he served on the Scientific Advisory Board of the Polycystic Kidney Research Foundation, was a Councilor of the American Society of Clinical Investigation, and a member of the Board of Directors of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. He has received multiple awards including an NIH MERIT Award, induction into the Association of American Physicians, and the Lillian Jean Kaplan International Prize for the Advancement in the Understanding of Polycystic Kidney Disease.

He received his undergraduate degree in biology from Loyola University of Chicago and in 1983 received his medical degree from the Pritzker School of Medicine at the University of Chicago. In the same year, he began further training in internal medicine and nephrology at Yale University and stayed on as a junior faculty member for another four years. He then spent a research year at Oxford University in England. He started at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 1992 and became a full professor in 2003.

He is a Senior Investigator in the Kidney Disease Branch of the NIDDK Division of Intramural Research. The main focus of his research is on the molecular basis of renal cystic disease, such as autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), one of the most common inherited disorders and cause 4-5 percent of all end stage kidney disease in the United States. Individuals with ADPKD also suffer from other complications such as hypertension, cyst infections, abdominal pain and have an increased risk of intracranial aneurysms. Present ADPKD management is focused on treating symptoms. Understanding the mechanisms of ADPDK will allow us to develop safe and effective treatments.